Author Topic: taking off on sub-6' boards  (Read 1725 times)

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Offline EastEndWahine

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Re: taking off on sub-6' boards
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2008, 12:42:23 PM »
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  • yeah it's a bad habit to lever yourself off your back foot to pop up.  I was doing that on my funboard, but had to quit that habit when I moved to 6' and under boards.  It has to be one fluid motion.  Some people even land with their front foot just before their back foot I think.  Not sure what I do.

    practice, practice, practice.  When I was learning how to shortboard this spring/summer I went out every day....even the 1 foot mush.  I think a few of those sessions were purely to work on my takeoffs.  My popup got a lot faster and better just from constantly working on it, and then once we got decent waves it was so easy.  Now I don't blow takeoffs nearly as much  ;D
    "Once you have flown, you will walk the Earth with your eyes turned skyward; for there you have been, there you long to return."  da Vinci

    Offline Old_Rock_Guy_in_NH

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    Re: taking off on sub-6' boards
    « Reply #16 on: September 06, 2008, 04:44:20 PM »
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  • Loseness nailed it completely, though I will add one sort of advanced piece to the whole take-off event, and this is really a shortboard technique/requirement.  As your hitting your feet (think, BOOM fast) you should also be initiating your top turn, particularly on your frontside drops.  So picture hitting your feet in a semi-crouch and as you extend your legs out and under you, as the board falls away, you also roll your ankles and push down the inside rail (especially the back foot), all in one seemless and fluid motion, while pointing your lead hand/shoulder down the line. This way when you get to your full height you are ready to release the rail, if need be, and hit a pump or two to set up your first move.  Of course this assumes you are taking off in a critical part of the wave and are not out on the shoulder.  By doing this you will find you are rarely caught behind a section.  If you watch a pro surfer, they rarely travel down the face of a wave on take-off, but are just mostly flicking the board under their feet and heading down the line, ready to find the first lip to hit or barrel tuck that's available.  If you struggle to your feet too slow or draw out the take-off too much, you have most likely missed the best part of the wave to pull a move on.

    « Last Edit: September 06, 2008, 04:52:01 PM by Old_Rock_Guy_in_NH »
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    Offline EastEndWahine

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    Re: taking off on sub-6' boards
    « Reply #17 on: September 06, 2008, 05:47:40 PM »
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  • Loseness nailed it completely, though I will add one sort of advanced piece to the whole take-off event, and this is really a shortboard technique/requirement.  As your hitting your feet (think, BOOM fast) you should also be initiating your top turn, particularly on your frontside drops.  So picture hitting your feet in a semi-crouch and as you extend your legs out and under you, as the board falls away, you also roll your ankles and push down the inside rail (especially the back foot), all in one seemless and fluid motion, while pointing your lead hand/shoulder down the line. This way when you get to your full height you are ready to release the rail, if need be, and hit a pump or two to set up your first move.  Of course this assumes you are taking off in a critical part of the wave and are not out on the shoulder.  By doing this you will find you are rarely caught behind a section.  If you watch a pro surfer, they rarely travel down the face of a wave on take-off, but are just mostly flicking the board under their feet and heading down the line, ready to find the first lip to hit or barrel tuck that's available.  If you struggle to your feet too slow or draw out the take-off too much, you have most likely missed the best part of the wave to pull a move on.



    pretty good advice, especially on the waves we get around here.  gotta try to keep this in mind as I think I'm lagging too much after takeoff and not starting down the line quick enough.
    "Once you have flown, you will walk the Earth with your eyes turned skyward; for there you have been, there you long to return."  da Vinci