Author Topic: Sandy and Your Garden  (Read 2643 times)

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Offline Shacky

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Sandy and Your Garden
« on: November 30, 2012, 02:25:12 PM »
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  • If you were wondering why all your plants are wilting or dieing....
     
      Function
    •   Salt water kills a plant by drawing water away from its roots and by interfering with the plant's ability to absorb nutrients from the soil. In water, salt breaks down into sodium and chloride. Sodium replaces soil nutrients needed by plants, and chloride interferes with photosynthesis in the leaves.
    Effects
    •   Symptoms of salt water contamination include browning, stunted growth and plant death. Plants that grow along a roadside may turn brown or die if rock salt is used to de-ice the road.
    Solution
    •   On your property, use sodium-free de-icing agents, such as calcium chloride or sand, on walkways and driveways. According to the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension, rainfall or irrigation will leach salt from the soil, but the process can take several years in some soils. You can grow salt-tolerant plants or crops such as juniper or sorghum
    « Last Edit: November 30, 2012, 02:32:52 PM by Shacky »
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    Offline Shacky

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #1 on: November 30, 2012, 02:32:23 PM »
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  • Heres a listing of salt tolerance for herbaceous crops.  Good to know Asparagus is pretty tolerant, since I've been working on it for two years. 
     
    http://www.ussl.ars.usda.gov/pls/caliche/SALTT42C
     
     
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    Offline Shacky

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #2 on: November 30, 2012, 02:50:16 PM »
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  • Researching this is leading me to areas I know little of such as using salt water for irrigation and genetically engineering plants to be salt tolerant. 
     
    Here's a link on Halophytes
     
    http://www.redsalinidad.com.ar/assets/files/mejoramiento/blumwaldhalophytes.pdf
     
     
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    Offline snaggletooth

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #3 on: November 30, 2012, 03:15:16 PM »
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  • salt tolerant plants don't stand a chance against what we just had. very few of our plants made it after irene and i imagine none will make it after this round. this round was worse, also, because there was a lot of fuel in the water. we have these privacy shrubs that came back after irene, which was amazing, since they were well underwater for that storm. i will give them a chance, but i don't think they will make it this time.
     
    we will dig up a lot of the soil and replace it. last year we spread an amendment - can't remember. i think gypsum?
     
    i've thought of transplanting some of the grass that grows on the marsh islands behind our house to right around our bulkhead, but our soil may not be wet enough for them.

    Offline ankleslapper

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #4 on: November 30, 2012, 05:36:24 PM »
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  • we've been dosing with fresh water to try to save a few.  lost a favorite tree in neighbor's yard -- all of our windows overlooked it, and it was an eco-system unto itself -- hosted every kind of bird imaginable.  there's a large cedar on their property too...it's had some browning, but I hope might pull through --- shacky, do you know if it can hang on through mild browning, or is that one lost too?  we transplanted a few hedges from near my neighbors' foundation.  They seem to be staying green (just little pine-needle-like privacy hedges) --- even though the masonry guys dug them up pretty aggressively.  I guess we'll all be getting some new stock in the Spring.  By then, I'll be really ready for some green, some color, some 'life' outside (barely want to look out a window right now much less spend time outside).  already thinking of Spring & getting going again in the gardens.


    I know it's always a concern in urban environments, but guess we should all assume there will be an extra dose of lead in the soil this Spring? (more concern for vegetable growing -- I know most of us use pots/raised beds)
    the A is a small price to pay

    Offline ChopChaser

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #5 on: January 20, 2013, 09:04:18 AM »
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  • Ankleslapper def more heavy metals in the soil now after the harbor bottom was churned. I'm more worried about petroleum distalletes, PCBs, benzyne, and phthalates, that is what streaked the high water mark around town. Unfortunately, much of the soil testing outfits only cover heavy metals, except for Cornell if I remember correctly. Once we know mix and concentration of pollutants, a decision can be made to remediate or remove.
    « Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 09:06:58 AM by ChopChaser »
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    Offline ChopChaser

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #6 on: January 20, 2013, 09:20:16 AM »
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  • As far as salts go, flood your garden, and switch to halophytes and get ready for the best tasting bumper crop of cherry tomatoes in Rockaway's history. One good thing about sea bed upheaval is a distribution of phosphates which will be a flowering boost in the spring for those species that survived. This happened in the Fl.keys after the Atlantic met the gulf during a hurricane a few years ago.
    « Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 09:26:33 AM by ChopChaser »
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    Offline Northstreet

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    Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #7 on: January 20, 2013, 09:32:15 AM »
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  • Really don't think heavy metals and pcbs from the harbor made it to the Rock.  Plus, you need to understand the    background conditions and do a detailed risk assessment and bio assay.   The worst pollution probably came from fuel and oil leaks.  If you are really worried, change your veggie soil.  We all live in a horribly polluted area to begin with.  Areas around former landfills, power plants, dry cleaners, and filling stations are really bad. 

    Offline Shacky

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #8 on: January 21, 2013, 01:42:55 PM »
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  • I'm getting our soil tested and will post the results when I receive them. 
     
    On a positive note my Montauk Daisy has buds sprouting all over it.  I'll take any sign of life I can get....
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    Offline jscottk

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #9 on: January 21, 2013, 05:04:07 PM »
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  • If anything of ours survives I hope it's the bamboo
    4 years of growth ... From 5 bushes 4 feet tall to a bamboo forest
    I really hope it makes it.  It's brown with a little green now.
    ..Whore it to death then sell the corpse on Craigslist... (used to be Ebay but eff Ebay and Paypal)

    Offline Shacky

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #10 on: January 21, 2013, 06:04:25 PM »
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  • That's some hardy stuff my friend.  I'm betting it'll be fine.
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    Offline ChopChaser

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #11 on: January 21, 2013, 07:34:49 PM »
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  • Yeah bamboo is hard to kill scott, if the buds are still green should be promising. Shacky your apples seem to be swelling a bit at the buds, not as much as the peaches but def enough to be optimistic for some survivors.
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    Offline malibu casey

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #12 on: January 22, 2013, 08:16:52 AM »
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  • Any recommendations for helping/saving lilacs?  With everything else on my mind I guess I didn't think to do anything to if after the storm.  Everything else can be replaced but this is really sentimental.
    look around, look around, look around. all around, all around, all around

    Offline Shacky

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #13 on: January 22, 2013, 01:14:02 PM »
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  • Yeah bamboo is hard to kill scott, if the buds are still green should be promising. Shacky your apples seem to be swelling a bit at the buds, not as much as the peaches but def enough to be optimistic for some survivors.
    I noticed.  And the color looks generally good.


    What I've hated seeing the most is old evergreens like my holly dropping all their leaves.  It'll take years for them to come back, which means bye bye li'l holly. 
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    Offline ankleslapper

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    Re: Sandy and Your Garden
    « Reply #14 on: January 22, 2013, 06:47:09 PM »
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  • Shacky -- we've noticed many 'brown' evergreens in recent travels -- not all by flood/saltwater areas.  Wondering if there could be something else going on too.  That big cedar next to my house better hang on -- it's the only significant/older tree we've got nearby since the sewer project and then Sandy blew through  :'(
    for all (malibu casey, maybe your lilac?) --- we've been told Gypsum will help plants get nutrients after being inundated by salt.  geez, all the poor worms probably salt-cured.
    the A is a small price to pay