Author Topic: Swimming and breathing question.  (Read 1298 times)

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Offline Mark E

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Swimming and breathing question.
« on: July 05, 2012, 01:42:38 PM »
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  • When I run I breath fairly heavily, I have heard we should run at a rate at which it is possible to talk but not to be able to sing. How does it work when swimming. I find it is a little alarming to be breathing hard when in the water. It is not like running where you can stop running if you get out of breath. If you stop swimming you drown.


    Is heavy breathing while swimming distance something I need to get used to or should I reduce my pace?
    "Take care of your knees, you'll miss them when they are gone"

    Offline Bacon

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    Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #1 on: July 05, 2012, 04:39:56 PM »
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  • You might also want to check your septum. I just was recently told for the tenth time that my deviated septum (ice hockey days) is blocking more than 90% of one of my nostrils and fixing it will not only cut down on sinus infections, but also significantly increase my aerobic breathing. Farking hockey.
    I need the sea because it teaches me.

    Offline the Kook

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #2 on: July 05, 2012, 04:55:02 PM »
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  • You might also want to check your septum. I just was recently told for the tenth time that my deviated septum (ice hockey days) is blocking more than 90% of one of my nostrils and fixing it will not only cut down on sinus infections, but also significantly increase my aerobic breathing. Farking hockey.

    Great ploy to get your insurance to pay for the cosmetic surgery, bacon.  Well played.
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    Offline Dorado

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #3 on: July 05, 2012, 05:09:37 PM »
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  • The better at swimming you get the easier it is to control your breathing . That being said if you are looking to do some higher intensity swimming or some form of interval training the object is to exhaust your aerobic capacity stop and recover .
    Obviously will have to tread water if doing this open water stee .
    If you are looking to start a swimming regiment in the ocean .
    I'd recommend something to the effect of
    A) slow steady solid state warm up distance X
    Tread water adjust goggles etc
    B) sprint for x time( interval )  or distance say 1 jetty or 1/2 a Jetty whatever works for you and is cool with your level
    C ) slow solid state steady cool down .
    On the warm up and cool down always focus on breathing bi laterally if at all possible ( will make you stroke more balanced less one sided and be more efficient ) not everyone can do it but if starting out a good hank to get into .

    You can also just go and swim a few beaches if not into the whole structure thing .
    I occasionally in my tris I've done gone Out a little too fast and start to hyper ventilate . This is an uneasy feeling and requires a lot o mental disciPline to keep from wanting to stop and stand up .
    In ocean swimming keeping calm in a focused transe like state is key to comfort .
    I like to envision I'm a shark and that the ocean is my natural element .
    Be a shark .

    Offline Mark E

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #4 on: July 05, 2012, 05:50:15 PM »
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  • Thanks Dorado. What is the trick to ocean swimming without getting whistled in by the lifeguard?


     I'm thinking if I wear a swim cap and goggles they may take me for a serious swimmer and leave me alone.
    "Take care of your knees, you'll miss them when they are gone"

    Offline Dorado

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #5 on: July 05, 2012, 05:58:44 PM »
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  • I speak to them they will let you go if you look like you have a stroke . It helps to also know the OK sign used by Rock Guards . If they whistle at you flash them the OK : hands joined at side in a circle forming an O

    Offline Shacky

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #6 on: July 05, 2012, 11:07:27 PM »
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  • You can't stop the waves, but you can learn to surf.

    http://www.condotheband.com

    Offline PTSD

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #7 on: July 06, 2012, 07:18:52 AM »
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  • I swam a mile this morning, I def. have too much separation between my head and body when breathing. I gotta work on that. I just realized it when watching that vid.

    Thanks for posting this video Ryan.

    Mark early in the morning no one stresses you out about swimming just go out far enough so surfcaster can't reach you. 

    Offline Looseness

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #8 on: July 06, 2012, 12:06:49 PM »
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  • Breathing: breathing every stroke can be too much and actually make you more winded. That is unless you are sprinting and  need a lot of oxygen.
    If you are setting out to do a bit of a distance, alternate side breathing can be more efficient. So it goes, breath -stroke stroke, breath {other side} stroke stroke, breath {other side}.....this doesn't mean you can't double up sometimes and breath every stroke for some beats. I breath as needed when doing distance, alternate for the most part, but if i want I will breath same side for two strokes if I get a little oxygen hungry.


    Kicking.....I suck at it and when doing distance tend to kick WAY less, it makes me really out of breath. Apparently a lot of open water swimmers kick less, not that i am an open water swimmer, I haven't done much of that for a long time.
    But i think kicking a lot takes the wind right out of you, but that's just my feeling and how it works for me.
    It's no better to be safe than sorry....

    Offline the Kook

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #9 on: July 06, 2012, 12:22:03 PM »
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  • Breathing: breathing every stroke can be too much and actually make you more winded. That is unless you are sprinting and  need a lot of oxygen.
    If you are setting out to do a bit of a distance, alternate side breathing can be more efficient. So it goes, breath -stroke stroke, breath {other side} stroke stroke, breath {other side}.....this doesn't mean you can't double up sometimes and breath every stroke for some beats. I breath as needed when doing distance, alternate for the most part, but if i want I will breath same side for two strokes if I get a little oxygen hungry.


    Kicking.....I suck at it and when doing distance tend to kick WAY less, it makes me really out of breath. Apparently a lot of open water swimmers kick less, not that i am an open water swimmer, I haven't done much of that for a long time.
    But i think kicking a lot takes the wind right out of you, but that's just my feeling and how it works for me.

    I find that alternate breathing (every third stroke), so that I breath on both my right and left sides alternately, is more comfortable and "balanced".  Just my .02.  I, like Looseness, suck at kicking.  I can probably swim faster with a pull buoy than without.   :o   Most sprinters kick like 6 times/stoke cycle while distance swimmers will kick only twice in the same time.  Moving the large muscles of the legs takes a lot more effort than the arms and will tire you sooner.

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    Offline theusername

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #10 on: July 06, 2012, 01:07:52 PM »
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  • bi-lateral breathing (every other side) is something that a lot of open water swimmers recommend being comfortable doing as sometimes conditions will require being able to shift sides depending on how choppy the water is, and like others have said, it really does even out your stroke. i swim on a team with a bunch of open water swimmers/triathletes (one whom just completed the manhattan island marathon - 28 miles of open water around manhattan island) and while kicking is definitely done at a slower pace for distance, it is still considered very important for proper form and to get the most of each stroke.

    my guess is that if you're "breathing heavily" while swimming in open water, you're probably in need of a stroke clinic to improve your technique. swimming, even when going fast should feel like gliding, it's totally opposite to the way running and cycling work.


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    Offline Shacky

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    Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #11 on: July 06, 2012, 02:09:33 PM »
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  • Thinking some more about this... Mark...you run often.  You should feel less winded swimming then running, since your heart rate should be lower.  If this isn't the case then I'd agree with working on technique.  It's likely you'll need a lot of technique work.  I know I still do after many years.  It really helps.

    Anyone know a good technique coach that'll take someone on for just a few sessions? I'd like to get my stroke analyzed.  Has Rick ever coached dakook?
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    Offline HydroGlide

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #12 on: July 06, 2012, 02:50:06 PM »
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  • you may just be swimming too fast?
    good point about the bilateral breathing - my swim team coaches trained us to breathe to one side (my right) but that never worked well in the ocean when my right side faced out to sea.  I now breathe to both sides as often as needed to maintain a steady flow of air in and out of my lungs - i also used to power stroke pulling deep under my body but that is very inefficient try the high elbow technique (check youtube).

    Offline the Kook

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #13 on: July 06, 2012, 04:00:29 PM »
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  • Thinking some more about this... Mark...you run often.  You should feel less winded swimming then running, since your heart rate should be lower.  If this isn't the case then I'd agree with working on technique.  It's likely you'll need a lot of technique work.  I know I still do after many years.  It really helps.

    Anyone know a good technique coach that'll take someone on for just a few sessions? I'd like to get my stroke analyzed.  Has Rick ever coached dakook?

    If you are referring to the original rick kane coaching, no I don't think he has ever done any swim coaching.  After about 10 years of club and high school and 4 years of D1 collegiate swimming though, he could probably make a few recommendations.   ;D  That would be if you were willing to travel to Charleston for the sessions. 
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    Offline PTSD

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    Re: Swimming and breathing question.
    « Reply #14 on: July 06, 2012, 10:35:13 PM »
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  • Bilateral breathing is easier for me in deeper water (flatter water). Even if the waves are up I can mostly mange it but the wind can be a pain in the Arse and 400 people swimming around you kind of changes things up a bit. I think I move my head more then I need too or I don't pivot my body as much as I can. At this point swimming isn't so much about cardio it's about technique and focus. It's hard for me to focus for so long going relatively slow. Still, I will be out there again tomorrow AM. If the Mats can meet up so could a couple of swimmers, no?