Author Topic: Sorry, I gotta do it.  (Read 2290 times)

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Dave_in_NJ

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Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2007, 10:09:33 AM »
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  • Quote
    "I've been meaning to check that place out, but I never get around to it."

    they're just being polite. What they really mean is:

    " spend 1+ hours in traffic -not to mention $15 in tolls and a half a tank of gas) to surf comparable if not inferior waves in a dangerous environment vis a vi longboarders/people who surf oversized boards/ who lack etiquette and are lesser-skilled? Fuck that brown trout!"

    Offline SeaCliff

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #16 on: January 17, 2007, 10:44:15 AM »
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  • .....The typical ELI surfer travels about as far to get to the ocean  (ie: going over causways, bridges and whatnot) to get to the beach as residents of Wall, Toms River, Brick and Matawan (if not further). Meanwhile, towns in Mon Cty are fully suburbanized. As far as I can tell, the only part of LI that has similar access to NJ is LB, where there's no causeway to cross to get to the ocean, but I haven't searched the Island at all, so I'm sure I'm mistaken. Still, LB is strikingly similar in many ways to BMR/LCMO, NJ......

    ......What does all of this mean? Kids in towns that used to be reserved for summer tourism now roll out of bed at 6am during the school year, grab a skateboard/bike and their stuff and go to the end of their street and check the waves. If there are waves, they surf. You still can't do that on much of LI.

    Completely agree with this post - was thinking basically the exact same thing. It's an unfortunate reality that the the ocean is more of a destination on Long Island rather than a location - and it def has it's impact. Wonder what the annual surfboard sales #'s are for long island vs. jersey? On second thought, a better barometer would be surf WAX sales - a true indicator of actual activity!
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    Dave_in_NJ

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #17 on: January 17, 2007, 12:01:21 PM »
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  • I was searching for articles that compared the #'s, and this is what I came up with from 1987 (I postd the whole piece in the other room):

    From Montauk to Cape May, surfing is riding a crest of popularity unmatched since the endless summers of the 60's. All, however, is not totally awesome for the 15,000 surfers on Long Island and for the 50,000 here on the Jersey Shore, double the numbers of five years ago. At hot spots like Seaside Park, and especially on Long Island, surfers are worried about shrinking access to beaches caused by overcrowding and restrictions stemming from communities' inability to obtain liability insurance they can afford. Compromise in *central LI*

    Offline little_nasty

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #18 on: January 17, 2007, 01:31:07 PM »
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  • another way you could look at it is to do a search for surfshops in NY or NJ.  Using the yellow pages, i get 69 for NJ and 65 for NY.  Now you can adjust for rents, sq.ft., and all kinds of other factors, but i still don't think 3:1 is reasonable.

    http://yellowpages.superpages.com/listings.jsp?C=surfboard&S=NY&PS=45&STYPE=AS&L=NY&EG=0&MC=1&OO=1&F=1&EEM=1&CP=Sports+%26+Recreation%5EWater+Sports%5ESurfing%5ESurfboards+%26+Equipment%5ESurfboards+%26+Surfwear+Retail

    http://yellowpages.superpages.com/listings.jsp?C=surfboard&S=NJ&PS=45&STYPE=AS&L=NJ&EG=0&MC=1&OO=1&F=1&EEM=1&CP=Sports+%26+Recreation%5EWater+Sports%5ESurfing%5ESurfboards+%26+Equipment%5ESurfboards+%26+Surfwear+Retail


    But if you really want to know, you should just try and get ahold of the SIMA Retail Distribution Study which will definitely shed some light on the issue.

    but sounds a bit pricey..  http://www.twsbiz.com/twbiz/features/article/0,21214,1092647,00.html
    « Last Edit: January 17, 2007, 01:58:40 PM by little_nasty »

    Offline little_nasty

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #19 on: January 17, 2007, 01:48:38 PM »
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  • Daily News Record, Oct 17, 2005 p30

    CHARTING THE WAVE; RECENT STUDIES OFFER DETAILED SNAPSHOT OF BOARDSPORTS RETAILERS AND CONSUMER BRAND PREFERENCES.




    Full Text: COPYRIGHT 2005 Fairchild Publications, Inc.
    Byline: Adam Tschorn

    if you own a West Coast shop that sells surf- and skate-focused apparel to young men and your shelves are stocked with Ezekiel, Quiksilver and Volcom brand merchandise, then congratulations! Statistically speaking, you're in the surf/skate industry's sweet spot.

    That's just one of the conclusions that can be gleaned from the "Taking Stock With Teens" survey released by Piper Jaffray earlier this month and a comprehensive 2004 SIMA Retail Distribution Study conducted by Leisure Trends Group (highlights of which were presented earlier this year at the SIMA Surf Summit in San Jose del Cabo, Mexico).

    The SIMA study, which focuses on the $4.87 billion, 4,741-store "core" surf/skate business (and does not include chain stores such as PacSun, military exchanges or national department stores), offers a wealth of detailed data about a burgeoning boardsport business that, with the addition of those other channels, saw an estimated $6.52 billion in sales in 2004, a healthy comparison to the $12.3 billion outdoor retail market.

    In addition to quantifying the growth of the industry (the core surf/skate market, including apparel, hard goods and accessories, grew at a faster rate than the rest of the industry in 2004 -- up 12.4 percent in dollar sales over the previous year), the report found the business almost evenly split between surf ($2.46 billion in 2004 sales) and skate ($2.41 billion), with sales at skate-focused stores growing at a faster rate (20.1 percent) than at surf-focused stores (up 8.4 percent over 2003).

    It pegs the men's and boys' apparel segment of the market at nearly a billion dollars in retailsales, accounting for nearly one-fifth of the entire surf/skate industry's independent specialty retail dollars (18.7 percent, or $911.2 million, in 2004). That's second to the top category, surf/skate shoes, which represents 19 percent, or $922.6 million, of surf-skate dollars spent in 2004. Women's apparel was the fourth-best-selling category (10.1 percent, or $489.6 million) after surf and skate equipment (17.4 percent, or $847.9 million) and ahead of surf/skate sandals ($228.6 million).

    SIMA's study also shed light on geographic difference. Retailers in the westernmost 13 states accounted for $2.9 million (59.1 percent) of core surf/skate sales in 2004 ($1.8 billion, or 35.9 percent of the U.S. total from California, Oregon and Washington alone). The South was second in sales with 20.9 percent ($1 billion), followed by the Northeast ($633 million, or 13 percent) and the Midwest ($341 million, or 7 percent).

    The West also led the country in rate of growth for the surf/skate apparel category. According to the survey, the region enjoyed a 7.1 percent jump in gross retail dollar sales, followed by the South (up 4 percent), the Northeast (up 2.3 percent) and the Midwest (.06 percent). Comparing coast to coast, the West saw apparel sales climb 8.7 percent, while the East Coast retail sales grew at 3 percent.

    Men's and boys' sportswear was the single largest component of surf/skate apparel sales, making up anywhere from 53.8 percent (in the South) to 77.7 percent of all sales (in the Midwest). Men's and boys' boardshorts, which comprised anywhere from 1.1 percent (in the Midwest) to 12.8 percent (in the South) of the surf/skate retail dollars in 2004, ranked third behind women's and girls' apparel, which accounted for between 15.4 percent (in the Midwest) and 18.8 percent (in the South) of surf/skate apparel sales.

    But growth on the apparel side in 2004 (up 5.9 percent) was outstripped by surf and skate hard goods (up 14.4 percent), accessories (12.4 percent) and footwear (11 percent). The results also confirmed what many in the surf/skate apparel industry already sensed -- men's and boys' apparel is by far the most fragmented and competitive product category, with more than 136 different brands jousting for shelf space. Runner-up categories in the fragmentation derby were skateboard decks (more than 87 brands) and women's/girls' apparel (76 brands).

    For the first time, Piper Jaffray 's annual "Taking Stock With Teens" study, which looks at the market from the opposite side of the cash wrap, has specifically broken out preferences among boardsport brands. "Due to the immense popularity of boardsport apparel and the differentiated culture that it represents," the report explained, "we have decided to look specifically at preferred boardsport brands."

    This year's study, based on surveys of more than 600 students (average age 16.7) at 11 U.S. high schools, revealed that for the fall '05 season Volcom was the most preferred boardsport brand, with 41 percent of male and female respondents making the Costa Mesa, Calif.-based company their top choice. The number-two boardsport brand named by teens was Quiksilver (22 percent), followed by Ezekiel (8 percent), which hadn't even charted the previous spring. Tying for fourth place were Billabong, Hurley and Rusty (at 5 percent each). The Piper Jaffray report noted that boardsport brands accounted for 5.9 percent of overall votes for preferred brand among teens -- an increase from 5.5 percent the previous spring.

    In assessing overall brand preference (and not just the boardsport segment), the Piper Jaffray report also noted regional differences. Pacific Sunwear was top among teens on the West Coast (followed by Nordstrom, American Eagle and Hollister, respectively). Abercrombie & Fitch landed the top spot (19 percent) in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region (followed by a second-place tie between Hollister, Federated and Pacific Sunwear). In the Midwest it's Hollister that teens holler for (22 percent), followed by Abercrombie & Fitch (13 percent) and American Eagle (10 percent). Pacific Sunwear's PacSun and d.e.m.o. stores tied for fourth-most-preferred brand among Midwest teens (at 5 percent each).

    Pacific Sunwear remained the most preferred brand (overall) among teen males surveyed by Piper Jaffray, and held on to its fifth-place spot among female teens (see "The Kids Are All Right," p. 24.) Among all teens, the Irvine, Calif.-based surf/skate-influenced chain has been the third-most-preferred brand for the last two seasons (behind Hollister and Abercrombie & Fitch) and placed in the top three among teens since fall 2002.

    BREAKING IT DOWN

    Action sports specialty retail sales, by category

    Surf/Skate Shoes: $922.6m; 19.0%

    Surf/Skate Men's Apparel: $911.2m; 18.7%

    Surf/Skate Equipment: $847.9m; 17.4%

    Surf/Skate Women's Apparel: $489.6m; 10.1%

    Surf/Skate Sandals: $228.6m; 4.7%

    Surf/Skate Sunglasses: $208.m; 4.3%

    Surf/Skate Bags: $180.1m; 3.7%

    Surf/Skate Swimwear: $149.4m; 3.1%

    Surf/Skate Watches: $87.1m; 1.8%

    Surf Wetsuits: $73.4m; 1.5%

    Wakeboard Equipment: $31.1m; 0.6%

    Bodyboard Equipment: $25.9m; 0.5%

    Surf/Skate Other: $707.3m; 14.5%

    Total: $4.862b

    Source: SIMA RETAIL DISTRIBUTION STUDY

    ACTION ACROSS THE NATION

    Boardsports retail sales, by region

    West: $2.9B; 59%

    South: $1B; 21%

    Northeast: $633M; 13%

    Midwest: $341m; 7%

    Source: SIMA RETAIL DISTRIBUTION STUDY

    BRAND NEWS

    Suburban teens name their preferred boardsport brand

    Volcom 41%

    Quiksilver 22%

    Ezekiel 8%

    Billabong 5%

    Hurley 5%

    Rusty 5%

    Burton 3%

    O'Neill 3%

    Roxy 3%

    Split 3%

    Vans 3%

    Source: PIPER JAFFRAY & CO.

    Caption(s): A model sports a look from Ezekiel. / Volcom-sponsored surfer Bruce Irons catches some air. / PacSun is a teen favorite for boardsports apparel.


    WickedQuiver

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #20 on: January 17, 2007, 02:10:56 PM »
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  • yeah but seacliff and his boardshort purchases are juicing the NY numbers  ;D

    Offline SeaCliff

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #21 on: January 17, 2007, 02:28:18 PM »
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  • yeah but seacliff and his boardshort purchases are juicing the NY numbers  ;D

    Hhahahahahhahahahahaaaa...yeah...sad, but true!!
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    WickedQuiver

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #22 on: January 17, 2007, 02:43:37 PM »
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  • I agree NY plates in NJ is trending upward.

    On north wind days the Surfline rock-a-way cam puts NJ plates in the parking lot. Trust me.

    Monmouth County with its teardowns and new condo developments is quickly turning into Staten Island.

    Billy Joel versus Springsteen is no contest. Springsteen.

    I can't even pretend to know LI or NYC well enough to vote. But I voted for NJ anyway BOOYA.

    Offline Crackie Onassis

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #23 on: January 17, 2007, 06:13:14 PM »
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  • I agree NY plates in NJ is trending upward.

    On north wind days the Surfline ****-a-way cam puts NJ plates in the parking lot. Trust me.

    Monmouth County with its teardowns and new condo developments is quickly turning into Staten Island.

    Billy Joel versus Springsteen is no contest. Springsteen.

    I can't even pretend to know LI or NYC well enough to vote. But I voted for NJ anyway BOOYA.

    The only clear, non Manhattan, winners are Blue Oyster Cult (Long Island) but after them, whatcha got left, the effin Good Rats? Even the B-List Springsteen, Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes cancel out the Good Rats.

    Ramones don't count. There punk scene was in Manhattan, not Queens and writing a song about ****doesn't count.
    So heavy you can't even pick it up.

    Offline little_nasty

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #24 on: January 18, 2007, 02:37:46 PM »
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  • since when in manhattan not a part of NY? lol...

    what about Lou Reed, Pete Seeger, Mike Stoller, Erik B & Rakim, Tito Puente, Sugarhill Gang, Lovin' Spoonful, De la soul, Pat Benetar, The Weavers, Frankie Knuckles, Stray Cats, Public Enemy, Dr. Dre, Afrika Bambaataa, Wu-Tang Clan, Anthrax, Blondie, Beastie Boys, Joe Satriani, Stevie Vai, the Chantels, Twisted Sister, Blood Sweat and Tears, Dionand the belmonts , Foreigner, Otis Blackwell, Peter Paul and Mary, Bob Carlin, Shalamar and of course let's not forget Debbie Gibson or Taylor Dane, lol..

    Offline Mims

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #25 on: January 18, 2007, 03:24:49 PM »
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  • You forgot Cyndi Lauper, Jay-Z, LL Cool J, 50 cent, Dizzy Gillespie, Woody Guthrie, Run DMC, Paul Stanley... ;)

    The Ramones were from Forest Hills, which is in Queens. From anywhere in FH, you can take Yellowstone to Woodhaven which become Crossbay which leads to...you know where. Bruce Springsteen actually wrote a bunch of songs for the Ramones.

    Offline little_nasty

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    Re: Sorry, I gotta do it.
    « Reply #26 on: January 18, 2007, 05:37:26 PM »
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  • i know.. i had to take a call