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Back on Dry Land => The NY NJ Surf Garden Center => Topic started by: Shacky on November 30, 2012, 02:25:12 PM

Title: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Shacky on November 30, 2012, 02:25:12 PM
If you were wondering why all your plants are wilting or dieing....
 
  Function Effects Solution
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Shacky on November 30, 2012, 02:32:23 PM
Heres a listing of salt tolerance for herbaceous crops.  Good to know Asparagus is pretty tolerant, since I've been working on it for two years. 
 
http://www.ussl.ars.usda.gov/pls/caliche/SALTT42C (http://www.ussl.ars.usda.gov/pls/caliche/SALTT42C)
 
 
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Shacky on November 30, 2012, 02:50:16 PM
Researching this is leading me to areas I know little of such as using salt water for irrigation and genetically engineering plants to be salt tolerant. 
 
Here's a link on Halophytes
 
http://www.redsalinidad.com.ar/assets/files/mejoramiento/blumwaldhalophytes.pdf (http://www.redsalinidad.com.ar/assets/files/mejoramiento/blumwaldhalophytes.pdf)
 
 
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: snaggletooth on November 30, 2012, 03:15:16 PM
salt tolerant plants don't stand a chance against what we just had. very few of our plants made it after irene and i imagine none will make it after this round. this round was worse, also, because there was a lot of fuel in the water. we have these privacy shrubs that came back after irene, which was amazing, since they were well underwater for that storm. i will give them a chance, but i don't think they will make it this time.
 
we will dig up a lot of the soil and replace it. last year we spread an amendment - can't remember. i think gypsum?
 
i've thought of transplanting some of the grass that grows on the marsh islands behind our house to right around our bulkhead, but our soil may not be wet enough for them.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: ankleslapper on November 30, 2012, 05:36:24 PM
we've been dosing with fresh water to try to save a few.  lost a favorite tree in neighbor's yard -- all of our windows overlooked it, and it was an eco-system unto itself -- hosted every kind of bird imaginable.  there's a large cedar on their property too...it's had some browning, but I hope might pull through --- shacky, do you know if it can hang on through mild browning, or is that one lost too?  we transplanted a few hedges from near my neighbors' foundation.  They seem to be staying green (just little pine-needle-like privacy hedges) --- even though the masonry guys dug them up pretty aggressively.  I guess we'll all be getting some new stock in the Spring.  By then, I'll be really ready for some green, some color, some 'life' outside (barely want to look out a window right now much less spend time outside).  already thinking of Spring & getting going again in the gardens.


I know it's always a concern in urban environments, but guess we should all assume there will be an extra dose of lead in the soil this Spring? (more concern for vegetable growing -- I know most of us use pots/raised beds)
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: ChopChaser on January 20, 2013, 09:04:18 AM
Ankleslapper def more heavy metals in the soil now after the harbor bottom was churned. I'm more worried about petroleum distalletes, PCBs, benzyne, and phthalates, that is what streaked the high water mark around town. Unfortunately, much of the soil testing outfits only cover heavy metals, except for Cornell if I remember correctly. Once we know mix and concentration of pollutants, a decision can be made to remediate or remove.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: ChopChaser on January 20, 2013, 09:20:16 AM
As far as salts go, flood your garden, and switch to halophytes and get ready for the best tasting bumper crop of cherry tomatoes in Rockaway's history. One good thing about sea bed upheaval is a distribution of phosphates which will be a flowering boost in the spring for those species that survived. This happened in the Fl.keys after the Atlantic met the gulf during a hurricane a few years ago.
Title: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Northstreet on January 20, 2013, 09:32:15 AM
Really don't think heavy metals and pcbs from the harbor made it to the Rock.  Plus, you need to understand the    background conditions and do a detailed risk assessment and bio assay.   The worst pollution probably came from fuel and oil leaks.  If you are really worried, change your veggie soil.  We all live in a horribly polluted area to begin with.  Areas around former landfills, power plants, dry cleaners, and filling stations are really bad. 
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Shacky on January 21, 2013, 01:42:55 PM
I'm getting our soil tested and will post the results when I receive them. 
 
On a positive note my Montauk Daisy has buds sprouting all over it.  I'll take any sign of life I can get....
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: jscottk on January 21, 2013, 05:04:07 PM
If anything of ours survives I hope it's the bamboo
4 years of growth ... From 5 bushes 4 feet tall to a bamboo forest
I really hope it makes it.  It's brown with a little green now.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Shacky on January 21, 2013, 06:04:25 PM
That's some hardy stuff my friend.  I'm betting it'll be fine.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: ChopChaser on January 21, 2013, 07:34:49 PM
Yeah bamboo is hard to kill scott, if the buds are still green should be promising. Shacky your apples seem to be swelling a bit at the buds, not as much as the peaches but def enough to be optimistic for some survivors.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: malibu casey on January 22, 2013, 08:16:52 AM
Any recommendations for helping/saving lilacs?  With everything else on my mind I guess I didn't think to do anything to if after the storm.  Everything else can be replaced but this is really sentimental.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Shacky on January 22, 2013, 01:14:02 PM
Yeah bamboo is hard to kill scott, if the buds are still green should be promising. Shacky your apples seem to be swelling a bit at the buds, not as much as the peaches but def enough to be optimistic for some survivors.
I noticed.  And the color looks generally good.


What I've hated seeing the most is old evergreens like my holly dropping all their leaves.  It'll take years for them to come back, which means bye bye li'l holly. 
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: ankleslapper on January 22, 2013, 06:47:09 PM
Shacky -- we've noticed many 'brown' evergreens in recent travels -- not all by flood/saltwater areas.  Wondering if there could be something else going on too.  That big cedar next to my house better hang on -- it's the only significant/older tree we've got nearby since the sewer project and then Sandy blew through  :'(
for all (malibu casey, maybe your lilac?) --- we've been told Gypsum will help plants get nutrients after being inundated by salt.  geez, all the poor worms probably salt-cured.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Årne Longbörgenssen on January 22, 2013, 08:42:46 PM
...here's a gem/mindblower:

http://arnoldia.arboretum.harvard.edu/pdf/articles/1939-7--salt-water-injury-of-woody-plants-resulting-from-the-hurricane-of-september-21-1938.pdf (http://arnoldia.arboretum.harvard.edu/pdf/articles/1939-7--salt-water-injury-of-woody-plants-resulting-from-the-hurricane-of-september-21-1938.pdf)
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Crackie Onassis on January 23, 2013, 07:46:30 AM
As long as the Neponsit Mint crop comes in . ..
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Shacky on January 23, 2013, 12:55:28 PM
Great, great find Arne! Thank you. 
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: snaggletooth on January 23, 2013, 02:15:25 PM
Shacky -- we've noticed many 'brown' evergreens in recent travels -- not all by flood/saltwater areas.  Wondering if there could be something else going on too.  That big cedar next to my house better hang on -- it's the only significant/older tree we've got nearby since the sewer project and then Sandy blew through  :'(
for all (malibu casey, maybe your lilac?) --- we've been told Gypsum will help plants get nutrients after being inundated by salt.  geez, all the poor worms probably salt-cured.

yeah - after irene we spread a lot of gypsum and a lot of stuff came back. i pretty much dug everything up after this one - just sort of gave up. oddly, some bulbs are starting to pop up. we were told last year by the nursery that you can put a lot of gypsum down - it doesn't have any negative effects.
not sure about others, but we also tossed our compost pile. it was full of worms pre storm and after, they were all gone / disintegrated. i figured the compost was salt-ridden / toxic.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Årne Longbörgenssen on January 23, 2013, 07:46:00 PM
As long as the Neponsit Mint crop comes in . ..


don't think i haven't been fretting about this.


there is a plan B however.
three summers ago, some of the neponsit mint line was transplanted to an undisclosed location in western massachusetts, where it is thriving. if the indigenous rockaway mint proves to have been wiped out, it can be re-introduced from the massachusetts stock.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: PTSD on January 25, 2013, 09:18:37 PM
I haven't focused on my garden yet becauses I'm pushing hard to move into my home Feb 8 come hell or... WTF!  I want to get into my home, home soon.

I'm hopeful everything survives. I think my June berries (May berries with climate change) will be fine. I have my fingers crossed for the laurels and plumb trees. Doesn't look great but maybe. I noticed my irises are still green and before the deep cold the M. Daisies looked very strong. 90% of the bonsai went the way of the Gowanis Dolphin, sigh. Let's see. Soil change is an option for the veggie box but everyone else just has to find a way but I will help.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: jammy on February 26, 2013, 07:59:19 AM
daffodils!
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: snaggletooth on February 26, 2013, 09:33:38 AM
daffodils!

a bunch of crocuses came up in our bare yard. crazy.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: ankleslapper on February 26, 2013, 02:37:41 PM
daffodils!
a bunch of crocuses came up in our bare yard. crazy.
yes - saw daffodils popping up on the beach block!  We have irises planted last year that are green & popped up through soil as well.  One big shrub in backyard has green in its branches -- our baby cedar that we transplanted after we found it growing through a crack in our driveway years ago -- is not so happy (it re-rooted in the back of our yard, but I think it might have gotten salt-fried).  c'mon warmth & sunshine & green.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: bones on July 09, 2013, 10:09:02 PM
I am looking for a landscaper/gardner that works in LB to help me recover from from some bad post Sandy advice/actions by my previous contractor, who has lost my confidence.  Would love some experienced suggestions.

Thx
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: onefinookas on July 10, 2013, 08:16:20 AM
neither a landscaper or gardner by profession however our garden has made quite a successful recovery and we did research when it came to replacing plants we lost with more salt tolerant varieties.  Glad to lend a hand, give some pointers, and get you back up and going.  Where in LB are you, East, West or Central.  Just shoot me a pm.
Title: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: bones on July 10, 2013, 06:14:25 PM
Onefin that is an awesome offer that I will accept. I will pm. Thx
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: snaggletooth on July 11, 2013, 10:18:56 AM
Onefin that is an awesome offer that I will accept. I will pm. Thx

come visit onefin and my garden. the front is a jungle, and the back is looking really cool  ;D
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Shacky on July 11, 2013, 05:30:31 PM
I am looking for a landscaper/gardner that works in LB to help me recover from from some bad post Sandy advice/actions by my previous contractor, who has lost my confidence.  Would love some experienced suggestions.

Thx

I'd be glad to offer my advice as well.  PM me.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: uncutproducts on August 07, 2013, 11:01:48 AM
lawn: i put down a ton of pelletized gypsum and lime. lawn is looking better than before the storm. put down fresh coat of top soil and compost before reseeding. organic fertilizer and actually water it now.


hedges:  coming back, a bit thinner than last year but getting better. put down a bunch of holly-tone.


trees: lost one giant yew tree and the others next to him are still salt burned but coming back. cedar trees got burned from spray too, gonna wait until next year to see if they come back.


garden: built beds raised to 30".  hope thats high enough.


now if i could figure some way to keep deer out of my yard.
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: snaggletooth on August 07, 2013, 11:25:22 AM
our patio/backyard was a horrible mudpit post-Sandy. We had privacy hedges that were sad after Irene and i figured would be worse after Sandy. They were also messy and took up too much space. We didn't want to spend a lot of money, but I wanted to come up with a solution that would minimize mud (especially with 5 dogs), maximize drainage, and hopefully protect the plants from another storm. So, i ordered a bunch of livestock troughs from a farm supply place and ta-da! pea gravel keeps things neat and allows for drainage, plants seem happy (check out the peaches!) and the backyard is now enjoyable, for a fairly small investment.
 
(http://www.nynjsurf.com/forum/media/sa.media/in.12680/preview./)
(http://www.nynjsurf.com/forum/media/sa.media/in.12681/preview./)
 
(http://www.nynjsurf.com/forum/media/sa.media/in.12683/preview./)
 
(http://www.nynjsurf.com/forum/media/sa.media/in.12684/preview./)
(http://www.nynjsurf.com/forum/media/sa.media/in.12685/preview./)
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: bones on August 07, 2013, 05:03:05 PM
Lovely!!
Title: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: Mayday on August 07, 2013, 05:10:34 PM
Damn that looks nice!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Sandy and Your Garden
Post by: onefinookas on August 08, 2013, 01:57:01 AM
there are some apples, blueberries, strawberries, and heeps of herbs in the pictures as well.  Container gardening certainly has its benefits, or trough gardening in our case, when dealing with a small space.  It gives you the opportunity to treat each container like a separate garden.  It was a brown trout ton of work that in hind site was well worth it.  Feel free to check it out sometime.  The new front yard gardens came out pretty epic as well.  I have no pictures, sorry.