Author Topic: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy  (Read 1355 times)

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Offline Ghost of WQ

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Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
« on: December 12, 2012, 08:18:38 PM »
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  • Fantastic piece on Sandy.


    Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/11/jersey-shore-development_n_2267557.html


    Offline HydroGlide

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    Re: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #1 on: December 13, 2012, 03:15:04 PM »
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  • great article - thanks.  NJ really needs to change up the rebuilding mentality this time around.  Lower east side manhattan (downtown not LES) is still running on humming generators - the electrical guts can easily be rebuilt on higher floors but these buildings are gonna get soaked again next time - first 9/11 and now Sandy - who the hell would want to invest in space down here anymore if the flooding potential isn't addressed (especially given the ease of setting up remote workplaces today)? Doing nothing downtown could have a pretty significant impact to the economic future of Manhattan.   


     http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/maintenance-supervisor-fought-sandy-article-1.1219182
    « Last Edit: December 13, 2012, 03:17:20 PM by HydroGlide »

    Offline jerseysurfer

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    Re: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #2 on: December 13, 2012, 05:24:16 PM »
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  • While intresting whats the point? Its a natural disaster, when San Francisco is half destroyed by a 8. something earthquake are the people who live their going to leave? Will not that City be rebuilt? Is the government going to say you can't build on a earthquake fault? The people who live their know a earthquake will happen but they love their city and are willing to take the risk.

    If people want to live at the beach, want to take the chance of flooding/waves etc, want to pay the money for insurance, want to take the chance that their house will be destroyed, if not likely to be destroyed, or if a business owner wants to build a beach club on the beach, then let them also take the risk. Not for nuthing its not like any structure that was on the "other" side of the sea wall in Sea Bright survived without damage. The City of Long Branch 5 miles to the south has built the pier village right on the beach. Its miles long hotel,condos, shops,resturants,boardwalk. Somehow it came through storm in fairly good shape. No huge sea wall protecting it, if there is a failure may be its the sea wall not the development.

    Offline Ghost of WQ

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    Re: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #3 on: December 20, 2012, 08:24:39 AM »
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  • Report from LBI



    Lots of builders and investors going door to door, they are making deals on the spot, they are paying cash (yeah, not literally). Some of the prices I’ve heard whispered were very good, and I expect large raised homes to be built on those properties and the builders to make a mint. The catch here is you’ll need to have cash, no bank will lend on these properties.


    Lots of old timers are letting go at low prices, they can’t afford to rebuild nor do their kids want to take responsibility for rebuilding (or they simply can’t).


    Even a number who are patching up have intentions to sell once things “get back to normal”.

    Offline jscottk

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    Re: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #4 on: December 20, 2012, 04:03:36 PM »
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  • En quote our insurance adjuster while he looked over our home..




    (Say this with a heavy Floridian accent )


    Iv been through 5 hurricanes and been doing this job for 12 years..
    Every town thats ever been knocked down, always was built back up , bigger, better and by people who wanted to stay there.
    ..Whore it to death then sell the corpse on Craigslist... (used to be Ebay but eff Ebay and Paypal)

    Offline Ghost of WQ

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    Re: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #5 on: December 21, 2012, 05:59:39 PM »
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  • Is bigger better on a barrier island?


    Barrier islands are nature's shock absorbers against killer storm surges hitting the main land. The islands shift, erode and rebuild themselves in response to the ocean's whims. Trying to control them with sand replenishment groins, jetties, sea walls etc is a fool's game.


    As a taxpayer, why should I be on the hook for protecting private property investments on a barrier island?


    Some look at Sandy as a once in a life time event. This was a one percent storm. The NHC has consistently estimated a 1% chance of a Sandy caliber storm hitting NY/NJ in their annually hurricane season forecasts.  This year, mother nature spun the hurricane season roulette wheel and the ball landed on red 12. Let's not pretend this can't happen again.




    It seems to me, many barrier island residents have the same mentally as Wall Street. Let's privatize the profits (ie living by the beach) and socialize the risk with government backed mortgages, subsidized flood insurance and FEMA money when mother nature brings it.


    When I look at a place like Rockaway, I see an area where the real estate taxes and insurance premiums do not reflect the true cost/risk of living there.

    Offline Ghost of WQ

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    Re: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #6 on: December 23, 2012, 01:11:59 PM »
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  • this is the reality of the situation


    FEMA delivers a blow at Shore
    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/politics/20121223_FEMA_plan_poses_high_bar_to_rebuild.html


    Offline Northstreet

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    Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #7 on: December 23, 2012, 01:55:48 PM »
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  • Not that it matters on the new FEMA maps-they've been revising them ever since Katrina, but this storm looks like a little under a 300 year event so far....

    Offline Northstreet

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    Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #8 on: December 23, 2012, 03:41:02 PM »
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  • Once the water comes over the beach berm, the difference between a 100 something year storm and a 500 year storm is just a couple feet.  But we have had a few hundred year storm events in the last hundred years...

    Offline NJ Longboarder

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    Re: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #9 on: December 24, 2012, 10:43:23 AM »
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  • Is bigger better on a barrier island?

    Barrier islands are nature's shock absorbers against killer storm surges hitting the main land. The islands shift, erode and rebuild themselves in response to the ocean's whims. Trying to control them with sand replenishment groins, jetties, sea walls etc is a fool's game.

    As a taxpayer, why should I be on the hook for protecting private property investments on a barrier island?

    Some look at Sandy as a once in a life time event. This was a one percent storm. The NHC has consistently estimated a 1% chance of a Sandy caliber storm hitting NY/NJ in their annually hurricane season forecasts.  This year, mother nature spun the hurricane season roulette wheel and the ball landed on red 12. Let's not pretend this can't happen again.

    It seems to me, many barrier island residents have the same mentally as Wall Street. Let's privatize the profits (ie living by the beach) and socialize the risk with government backed mortgages, subsidized flood insurance and FEMA money when mother nature brings it.

    When I look at a place like Rockaway, I see an area where the real estate taxes and insurance premiums do not reflect the true cost/risk of living there.

    Never thought I would here this on a surf forum.  There is plenty of damage on the "mainland" portions of NJ.  Coast from Long Branch down to Bayhead.  Also a significant amount of damage to low lying communties in the back bays from Manahawkin up to Keansburg and Union Beach. 

    As a tax payer, I would rather see the people get help, rather than fund failing companies.  People in flood risk areas pay higher insurance premiums and should receive fair and immediate payment when an event occurs, easy as that.  Maybe even throw in a little compassion for people who lost everything, but are capped at $250k.  They will all have to fight for every penny and may never receive the full amount.  It's been almost 2 months and most people haven't seen a dime. 





    Offline Ghost of WQ

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    Re: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #10 on: January 06, 2013, 03:20:15 PM »
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  • Remind me why I should give two rips about these people:

    Toms River homeowners slow to give up land needed to rebuild protective dunes
    http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2013/01/toms_river_homeowners_slow_to.html


    The sticking point, homeowners say, is what they may have to give up. Homeowners fear that giving away the land also means they will have to open their beaches to the public.

    Patricia Suriani, a member of one of the homeowners association boards that hasn’t signed, says a majority of the residents voted against giving the easement because they don’t want the private beach open to the public. She said the easement request, seeking the strip of property "in perpetuity," is vague and doesn’t give residents any assurance that they won’t be required to build public bathrooms or a boardwalk.

    Offline RayG

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    Re: Jersey Shore Development Failures Exposed By Hurricane Sandy
    « Reply #11 on: January 09, 2013, 11:07:00 AM »
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  • They can do what nearly every OTHER beach town in NJ does. The BEACH itself is public, yet you can't park anywhere legally to access the beach. No parking or resident only parking solves their problem. BUT- if they choose that route, then THEY can pay for the dunes and get NO public aid if their houses get washed away again.
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